The Comedy of Errors

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The Comedy of Errors, Smock Alley Theatre

Writer: William Shakespeare

Director: Liam Halligan

“What? Did I marry her in my sleep?”

Two sets of twins separated at birth, a nun, a possible execution, a bondsman with a baton, a goldsmith lacking in gold, an over-enthusiastic kitchen maid, a wife, a mistress, infidelity, a tempest, demonic possession and a subversive sister. It can only be Shakespeare. One of the strangest and most farcical of his comedies is bought to the stage by Dublin’s Youth Theatre.

It is a wise choice of play; offering the actors plenty of opportunities to flex their comedy muscles. The Comedy of Errors is also particularly timely. The themes of separation, walls, and borders seem to resonate with today’s audience.

Foreigners are not welcome in Ephesus as a result of a trade war with the neighbouring Syracuse. This leads to the event that bookends the play: the impending execution of Syracusian trader Egeon, played by Tristan Spellman Molphy. He is the father of twins. When a poor woman gave birth to twins on the same day as his wife, he purchased them to be slaves to his sons. Shortly after this they undertook a sea voyage but were hit by a tempest. Wife and husband, brother and brother were separated. When Antipholus of Syracuse, along with his slave Dromio, goes in search of his missing family the stage is set for a great series of mishaps, farce, and family.

Ciara Cochrane and Penny Morris, playing the two different Dromio’s have many of the best lines and provide great comedy moments throughout; using their words and their bodies to elevate the language. Similarly, Rhys Coleman-Travers and Kit Geraghty, playing the two Antipholus’s, seem to be having great fun with the parts. The scenes in which Antipholus of Ephesus is arrested and finds himself embroiled in the confusion of mistaken identity is full of farce and quick action. As he loses his temper and is thought to be mad, or possessed by a demon, he becomes increasingly angry and increasingly funny. As the play accelerates the humour builds into a wonderfully funny denouement. The play ends on a final touching moment.

Under musical director Jack Cawley the musicians added atmosphere and drama to the production, being careful to never overpower the actors. Standing on a balcony to the left of the stage it was a wise move to have live music supplement the action on stage.

The Comedy of Errors ends with reconciliation, providing hope for our troubled times.

Runs until 18 August 2018 | Image: Contributed