Sweet Sensations

First Written for The Reviews Hub

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Sweet Sensations, Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin – Dublin Fringe Festival 2018

Writer: Teri Fitzgerald

Director: Teri Fitzgerald

Welcome to Peafield Hospital for the Elderly. Here you will find staff and residents living in harmony. Or not. This is a hospital where the staff like a slower pace of life than that of their patients. After all, what is the point in pushing oneself too much when the day could be spent on gossip, tea breaks, and sneaking cigarettes at every opportunity? Visitors are few and far between and life is quite dull. That is until HIQA turn up to inspect the hospital and the staff are driven into a frenzy of trying to present a good image. Their mission is frustrated by the residents, who have decided that they are going to rebel. Led by well-spoken and fiery Josie it is time for the tables to turn.

Oil is added to the fire with the arrival of Toby. On community service for drug offences, he is lairy, hilarious and a deeply kind figure in the midst of madness. When residents are living in such conditions, the somewhat unorthodox life and manner of Toby begins to seem normal, and soon he and the residents have concocted an explosive plan.

Writer and director Fitzgerald works to keep the tone upbeat, comedic and timely. The stage is set early on with an interesting rap and dance production from the staff who admit that they are running a ‘shit show’. This had the audience laughing from the off but at first, it was a bit uncomfortable for this reviewer who has had the experience of months spent in a hospital, and the hard edges of the staff, here used for comedy and to try and make a political point, seem painfully close to reality. It is not long before one is carried away by the fast pace and broad humour. There are many moments of physical comedy and the two care assistants, played by Ali Fox and Gemma Kane, and Laurence Falconer as Toby, are particularly entertaining to watch. The ending is surprisingly touching and meaningful and helped to elevate the play into something with a message to share.

It is also of note; the programme was well done, free to patrons and informative. This is something that is unfortunately quite rare.

Image: Contributed